Tag Archives: leather

Soulight On: Terrence Moline

soulight_terrenceSoulFul Design is proud
to present the series
Soulight On: a showcase featuring designers of color across different creative fields. My purpose is to shine light on fellow creatives that we don’t see in the mainstream design trades. My goal is for you to be inspired, be informed, be creative.

Terrence Moline has 15 years of experience as an illustrator and graphic designer. He received formal training in illustrative design and screen-printing at Loyola University of New Orleans, completed in 1998. Terrence has developed branding programs for the non-profit, food and beverage, and entertainment industries.

His client roster includes: New Orleans Multicultural Tourism Network, AT&T Executive Education and Conference Center, the Louis Armstrong Airport, The University of Texas at Austin, Goodwill Industries of Central Texas and Alliance Abroad Group.

1. How did you first become interested in graphic design?
My interest in design is rooted in a love for illustration and was sparked in elementary school when a teacher continually featured my doodles. Less lauded art were the illustrations I added to most of my creative writing assignments. My passion for art and copy evolved in high school when I was recruited to join the yearbook staff and my classmates started paying me to paint Disney characters on denim wears as well as when my cousin hired me to design night club flyers.

I only made the connection that this practice of organizing images and copy was called graphic design after changing my major from music to design at Loyola University in New Orleans. I made the decision to shift programs following the suggestion of a former high school classmate who majored in graphic design.

2. Often times, families of color look at the creative arts as a white thing that we should get a good job like a doctor, lawyer, government worker, etc. What did your family think about your choice of career? Do or did they support it?
My parents’ only wish for me was that I would be able to survive and take care of my family and myself. They weren’t too concerned with my career trajectory as long as it was legal. I think it took a while for my family to understand my line of work, but they’re on board now and very supportive. Continue reading Soulight On: Terrence Moline

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Soulight On: Meca McKinney

meca mckinney portraitSoulFul Design is proud
to present the series
Soulight On: a showcase featuring designers of color across different creative fields. My purpose is to shine light on fellow creatives that we don’t see in the mainstream design trades. My goal is for you to be inspired, be informed, be creative.

Leather artisan/designer Meca McKinney launched Jypsea Leathergoods, LLC as a line of hand-crafted eco-friendly, luxury leather handbags & accessories with an eclectic edge from her New Jersey-based design studio in 2009. In the spring of 2013, Jypsea will re-launch as a luxe home decor line. Meca uses only the finest skins from around the world as well as leather recycled from reclaimed jackets and garments whenever possible. She started Jypsea after years of working in the corporate fashion design industry in NYC because she simply believed that luxurious, hand-made, well-designed accessories should be accessible to all.

Jypsea has been featured in The Today Show, NBC Philadelphia’s The Ten! Spot, Clutch Magazine, Upscale Magazine, Trace Magazine, Computer Love: The Movie, numerous fashion blogs and in various art gallery exhibits including recent showcase with Raw NYC.

1. How did you first become interested in fashion/handbag/accessory design?
As a child, I’ve always been artistically talented, as my school district labeled me, and attended the Art Magnet program in my town. My mom made all of my clothes growing up. So by combining art and sewing, my career decision was made by the time I was 11. I studied fashion design in high school and went to the Fashion Institute of Technology (FIT) for college. Taking time off from school, I moved to Atlanta and worked as an assistant patternmaker for Rene Rene, a successful indie fashion brand there. One fateful day she had me design clutches for dresses that were in her collection—I decided to make a small collection of bags with the fabric I had in my apartment once I got home from work. I created seven styles, photographed them and made a catalog in one weekend. When I showed my boss on Monday, she was so impressed that she introduced me to her sewing contractors and they wanted to be my business partners! I knew then that I may have something. When I moved back to Jersey and re-enrolled at FIT, I changed my major from fashion design to accessory design and never looked back. And once I was introduced to using leather, I was IN LOVE.

2. Often times, families of color look at the creative arts as a white thing that we should get a good job like a doctor, lawyer, government worker, etc. What did your family think about your choice of career? Do or did they support it?
My mother told me there was no such thing as a black fashion designer and I had better go to school for business or she would not help me pay for college. So she didn’t help me pay for college. I had to follow my dreams. Now though, she understands that I could have never done anything else and still be happy. I was just not made for the standard 9 to 5. Continue reading Soulight On: Meca McKinney